Monoclonal Antibodies: A Treatment Option for COVID-19

What is Monoclonal Antibody Therapy?

Until now, individuals experiencing SARS COV-2 (Covid-19) had no way to alleviate their symptoms. At Superior Infusion Center in Plymouth, Michigan, we specialize in Covid-19 treatments through monoclonal antibody production. This helps to reduce the patients’ symptoms and improve their health.

With a large number of COVID-19 cases being reported in the US, the demand for monoclonal antibody treatments have been on the rise, especially in areas where there are low vaccination rates.

In a study published on the FDA Trusted Source, this experimental treatment is made from laboratory-made proteins that fight of harmful antigens such as viruses. This treatment has been used to combat SARS-CoV-2.

Monoclonal antibodies are similar to your body’s antibodies, but are selected for their strong ability to resist the virus.

We offer FREE information and consultations to find out if you are a good candidate for Monoclonal Antibody Treatment for COVID-19, and to see if you qualify. To learn more about this treatment, please call us at 734-404-6065.

 

How are antibodies made?

Antibodies are proteins made by the body’s immune system to fight off infections, including those caused by viruses. If you have been exposed to the same germ before, your body remembers how to make antibodies more quickly and efficiently.

MAbs have been used to treat various diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders.

To create them, researchers inject protein SARS-CoV-2 into a mouse and then collect some of its immune cells that create antibodies against the protein. In order to synthesize the desired antibodies, human cancer cells are fused with the antisense cells and allowed to multiply on a large scale. The process of generating these mAbs is quite intensive and often multiple copies of each antibody (also called “cocktails”) will be needed to work as a cure.

The approved COVID mAbs prove most successful when administered at the onset of symptoms. If there is inflammation in the lungs due to the immune system overreacting to an infection, then antibiotics do not work. Antibodies can appear less effective than usual and may even be harmful.

The Monoclonal Antibody Therapy has been found to be effective with those who have been exposed to an increased risk of progressing from a milder stage.

How does monoclonal antibody treatment work?

MAbs have been used to treat various diseases such as cancer and autoimmune disorders.

To create them, researchers inject protein SARS-CoV-2 into a mouse and then collect some of its immune cells that create antibodies against the protein. In order to synthesize the desired antibodies, human cancer cells are fused with the antisense cells and allowed to multiply on a large scale. The process of generating these mAbs is quite intensive and often multiple copies of each antibody (also called “cocktails”) will be needed to work as a cure.

The approved COVID mAbs prove most successful when administered at the onset of symptoms. If there is inflammation in the lungs due to the immune system overreacting to an infection, then antibiotics do not work. Antibodies can appear less effective than usual and may even be harmful.

How effective are monoclonal antibodies?

Recent studies show that Monoclonal antibodies may not only reduce COVID-19 hospitalization rates, but also increase CD4+ T-cell counts. They clinical trials have shown that these treatments can significantly decrease the number of hospitalizations and visits to the emergency department. They can also reduce or even completely eliminate the amount out virus found in an infected person’s blood.

COVID-19 Prioritization Guidelines

Superior Infusion follows FDA guidelines and prioritizes patients based on risk of severe disease to ensure treatment remains available.

Who is eligible to receive monoclonal antibody therapy?

Monoclonal antibody treatment is available to people who meet the following criteria:

  • Are high risk** for developing severe COVID-19 AND
  • Have a positive COVID-19 test and have not yet been admitted to the hospital AND
  • Are 12 years of age or older (and at least 88 pounds)

Post-exposure preventive monoclonal antibodies are available to those who have been exposed (consistent with the CDC’s close contact criteria)* AND who are:

  • High risk** for developing severe COVID-19 AND
  • Not fully vaccinated OR vaccinated but immunocompromised AND
  • 12 years of age or older (and at least 88 pounds)

**High risk includes any of the following:

  • 65 years of age or older
  • Overweight (body mass index over 25)
  • Pregnancy
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2)
  • Weakened immune system
  • Cardiovascular disease/hypertension
  • Chronic lung disease
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders
  • Medical-related technological dependence
  • Down syndrome
  • Dementia
  • Liver disease
  • Current or former smoker
  • Current or history of substance abuse
  • Immunosuppressive disease or immunosuppressive treatment
  • History of stroke or cerebrovascular disease
  • Chronic lung disease
  • Having a medical-related technological dependence (e.g., tracheostomy, gastrostomy)

Note: Monoclonal antibody treatment should be administered within 7 days of the start of symptoms.

Find out if you qualify to receive monoclonal antibodies treatment

Potential patients can find out if they qualify by speaking to their doctor. Patients and providers can also call 866-804-5251 for help.

What to Expect During Monoclonal Antibody Treatment

Monoclonal antibodies are given at our infusuion center locaded in Plymouth, Michigan., through an IV/needle in one arm or several shots during one visit. They should help keep your symptoms from worsening.

  • Research studies show that treatment with COVID-19 can lessen symptoms before they become too severe. Patients who receive the treatment are also less likely to worsen over time and need to seek medical attention or be admitted to the hospital.

The infusion involves the placement of a needle in a vein and slowly sending the medicine through an IV and into the body. The infusion takes about 30 minutes.

The injections can be given in four different locations, an arm, thigh, the stomach. This is usually done over the course of one office visit that takes around 5 to 10 minutes. After the injections or infusion is given, patients must wait at least 30 minutes so health care workers can watch for side effects. It’s important to plan for the entire appointment to last between one to two hours.

What are the side effects of monoclonal antibodies?

  • The most common reported side effects for bamlanivimab/etesevimab are:
  • Fever
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Rapid/slow heart rate
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Confusion

The most common reported side effects for casirivimab/imdevimab are:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Pneumonia
  • IV infusions & injections can also cause brief pain, bleeding, skin bruising, soreness or swelling. These complications are rare and can be easily solved with simple treatments.
  • Monoclonal antibodies may cause other side effect. Talk to your doctor if you experience any side effect that bothers you or does not go away quickly.

FAQ

Can I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I have had antibody treatment?

Monoclonal antibody is a form of treatment for infection from COVID-19. It’s also important to be vaccinated from the virus in order to prevent illness or further infection in the future. If you received monoclonal antibodies because you had illness due to COVID-19, wait 90 days before getting any dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Can you receive monoclonal antibodies treatment if you already received the COVID-19 vaccine?

If you have already received one or both doses of the vaccine and are eligible, you can receive this treatment

What is the cost of monoclonal antibody treatment?

Typically no cost, but we recommend that you contact your insurance company to learn more on the costs of monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19.

Is this treatment safe?

The FDA approved the use of monoclonal antibodies as treatment for COVID-19 in 2020.

If you’re interested in referring a patient to us or would like to inquire about the treatments we offer, call 734-404-6065 or toll-free at 1-877-261-5512.